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The Art Collectors's Table | Finn Juhl | 1948

The Art Collectors's Table | Finn Juhl | 1948

Finn Juhl designed the table for his and Niels Vodder's stand at the Cabinetmakers' Guild Exhibition at the Danish Museum of Art & Design in 1948. The table is produced in American black walnut, with a solid frame and edges. The tabletop is veneered, so that one can experience the grain of the tree in an unbroken fashion. The glass case is fitted in a separate case, which is also made from walnut and is removable.

Wood Type

Please note that the actual colours and materials may vary due to different screen balances and settings. While the version shown is supposed to be viewed only as an example, individual material photos can be found via our material page.

Product details

Design:

Finn Juhl

Year:

1948, relaunched in 2018

Materials:

Walnut, glass, brass

Dimensions:

L: 62/124 cm unfolded | B: 46 cm | H: 60 cm

Finn Juhl designed the table for his and Niels Vodder's stand at the Cabinetmakers' Guild Exhibition at the Danish Museum of Art & Design in 1948. The table is produced in American black walnut, with a solid frame and edges. The tabletop is veneered, so that one can experience the grain of the tree in an unbroken fashion. The glass case is fitted in a separate case, which is also made from walnut and is removable.

Product details

Design:

Finn Juhl

Year:

1948, relaunched in 2018

Materials:

Walnut, glass, brass

Dimensions:

L: 62/124 cm unfolded | B: 46 cm | H: 60 cm

About the Art Collectors's Table

The Hidden Treasure Chamber

Finn Juhl designed the table for his and Niels Vodder's stand at the Cabinetmakers' Guild Exhibition at the Danish Museum of Art & Design in 1948, which they named "An Art Collector's Study". Because of the exhibition and the table’s unique function, the table is known as the Art Collector’s Table today.

Even though the small table was a part of Finn Juhl's watercolours, depicting the composition of the stand - as well as the fact that detailed sketches revolving around the shape of the table exist, it cannot be spotted in any of the photographs from the 1948-exhibition. One can only guess as to why the table itself never made it into production. However, a rather qualified guess is that it became too intricate and time consuming for master joiner Niels Vodder to produce at the time.

Even today the production is an advanced process, with very low degrees of tolerance and where precision in every detail is vital to the design as a whole. 

The Art Collector's Table in walnut with the tabletop half open.
Art Collectors's Table

Unfolding the Hidden Details

In its closed form, The Art Collector’s Table presents itself with a simple, graphical expression, but it contains a very special hidden feature. Upon closer inspection, the richness in detail will unfold before your eyes; The split tabletop can be unfolded, revealing a glass case - a treasure chamber for the collector's most valuable objects. While the table is unfolded the leaves still function as two separate tabletops on which one can place a cup of coffee, while admiring the objects on display in the glass cover.

The table is produced in American black walnut, with a solid frame and edges. The tabletop is veneered, so that one can experience the grain of the tree in an unbroken fashion. The glass case is fitted in a separate case, which is also made from walnut and is removable.

The Art Collector's Table in walnut with the tabletop half open.
The Art Collector's Table in walnut with the tabletop half open.
The Art Collector's Table in walnut with the tabletop half open.
Finn Juhl's original watercolour depicting the table from 1948. Photo credit: Pernille Klemp, Designmuseum Danmark